Down on the Allotment

What's happening down on the allotment? An intimate account of a passionate veggie grower.

Sunday, October 17, 2010

Last of the Summer Vine!

Frost was forecast in parts of South England last night so I went around picking every last possible tomato, just in case. These are the ones to savour. When they are gone they are gone. Just tasteless supermarket obscenities from now on. These will be loved and appreciated.
I've been making an effort to have some produce over the Winter so many of my pots and containers have been planted with Winter salad leaves.
Of different shapes and colours. Attractive and edible!
Now, as regular blog readers will know - Matron does not do flowers! - but just every now and then some floral interlopers creep on to my patch. These lovely cheerful chappies are my Jerusalem Artichokes. Just getting ready to be dug up. Actually they are an awful pest - almost impossible to eradicate. I happen to love eating them so I struggle to keep them under control, but take heed of my wise words. If you do want to plant Jerusalem artichokes, think carefully where you will plant them. Just remember - like a rescue dog.. Jerusalem artichokes are not just for Christmas! they will be with you for a lifetime!
I pulled my small crop of Cylindra beetroot this afternoon. I love this shape of beetroot, they are so easy to handle, pick and slice.
I steamed them in the pressure cooker then peeled and sliced. Beautiful taste, and lovely tender texture. I was not alone in my appreciation of this gourmet treat....
Buddy loves beetroot!

15 Comments:

At 6:22 PM, Blogger Green Lane Allotments said...

We grew Jerusalem artichokes year ago. We planted them as a windbreak which gradully spread to over a metre wide thicket - it took ages to get rid of them. Digging them out was really hard work. They never produced any flowers either!

 
At 7:36 PM, Anonymous Damo said...

We had our first frost in South Wilts although the Dahlias have survived the nasturtiums which were running riot have been stopped in their tracks. So sad the last of the tomatoes, chillies and peppers, as you say make the most of them!

 
At 11:10 PM, Blogger Dan said...

Those beets look perfect! I must apologizes about being so late getting those tomato seeds to you. I will pack them tonight and get them in the box tomorrow. Good thing you don't start them any time soon :-)

 
At 4:33 AM, Blogger Wyatt said...

Those last few tomatoes are a real treasure. We are down to our last 6 or 7....so sad :(

Wyatt

 
At 12:17 PM, Blogger Jo said...

I picked the last of my tomatoes yesterday, they've been put on a windowsill to finish ripening. Buddy's a good dog eating healthy treats.

 
At 1:07 PM, Blogger Green thumb said...

Geographical disparities are intriguing! Just when I am in the process of planting vegetables for Winters after a relatively vegetable less heavy monsoon season, they are on there way out from your place.

 
At 2:32 PM, Anonymous ~fer said...

Your tomatoes look great! Is nice to see you still had so many around.

 
At 8:33 PM, Blogger Rob said...

Buddy is looking hopeful.

 
At 10:37 PM, Blogger Robert said...

It's not that hard to get rid og Jerusalems. Dig them out over winter, then wait for the survivorst to come up, and dig them out individually.

 
At 12:11 PM, Blogger Vegetable Heaven said...

Your winter salad leaves are really attractive. I like the dark leves - the flavour is more robust!

 
At 1:38 PM, Blogger Mr. H. said...

Your beets turned out very nice, the cylindra variety are one of my favorites too. Enjoy those tomatoes. Hmm...I wonder if our dog will eat cooked beets.

 
At 7:07 PM, Anonymous Mark said...

Not seen beets like that before. I will look out for them next year.

 
At 7:12 AM, Blogger Amy said...

I've been trying to work out if there's anything that I can put in my windowboxes over the winter to replace the summer's tomatoes, chillies and peppers. Interesting to see that you've got winter salad leaves in your pots - presumably that means I could plant them in my windowboxes too. What do you think?

 
At 8:07 AM, Blogger Matron said...

Amy - I think that would depend on the variety of leaves you choose. Only a handful of varieties are really completely hardy. You might be better off planting a brassica variety.

 
At 2:02 PM, Anonymous kitsapFG said...

Those beets are picture perfect. I skipped growing any beets in 2010 and am regretting it this fall. I will have to find some room for them in the 2011 garden.

Buddy is such a darling!

 

Post a Comment

<< Home

>