Down on the Allotment

What's happening down on the allotment? An intimate account of a passionate veggie grower.

Saturday, March 15, 2008

New Potatoes

Yesterday I prepared some beds for planting my new potatoes. The picture above is a French variety 'Vitelotte' also known as Black Truffle. It is a French variety and has a fantastic dark purple colour which stays when cooked. Although it is traditional to plant potatoes on Good Friday (ancient garden lore) I nipped ahead and put in a row of Red Duke of York. Next Friday I will plant my International Kidney (aka Jersey Royal).

I managed to get out yesterday in some bright sunshine and get lots of stuff done! I scattered some nasturtium seeds round the area where I have planted my broad beans. My thinking is that nasturtium act as a 'sacrifice plant' - that means that the blackfly love nasturtium leaves just as much as they like sitting on my broad beans. When the nasturtium leaves are covered in blackfly, then pick them and throw them away! I also scattered areas with the special seed mix for dogs (see previous post). Hopefully Buddy will enjoy nibbling on them from time to time and will get some essential vitamins and minerals. I also planted a thin row of chives in between the rows of carrots. This will help deter pests, in particular the carrot root fly. Fingers crossed.

11 Comments:

At 9:17 PM, Blogger Rob said...

I'll be interested to see how your purple spuds go on! Good luck.
Arran Pilot went in today under fleece cloche.

 
At 11:02 PM, Blogger Pepette said...

I really like the look of these - might add them to my wish list for next year. Or maybe I should wait to see how they get on!?

 
At 8:19 AM, Blogger Matron said...

pepette - I grew these potatoes last year, they are prolific and really floury. They make spectacular purple mash!

 
At 1:49 PM, Blogger Paul and Melanie said...

Those spuds look great and good to hear you've planted that dog seed stuff, I'll be interested to see how you and Buddy get on with it. :)

 
At 8:50 PM, Blogger clairesgarden said...

ooohhhh!! jealousy!! look how far ahead all your things are!! jings, i'm not a million miles away here but its sooooo much colder I've hardly started a thing.

 
At 3:08 AM, Blogger Lissa said...

Hello

I just found your blog today and have so enjoyed reading and seeing all the photos. I would love to learn how to do potatoes in a black bag. Also, if you could share stories from childhood and learning gardening from your father during the Dig for Victory. My grandmother had shared some stories and now I wish I had asked hundreds more questions about that time in history. I am from Cincinnati in Ohio in the US. Our yard is quite small, but my husband and I are wanting to do lots of things this spring/summer. Thanks much.
Lissa

 
At 3:09 AM, Blogger Lissa said...

I guess you can answer to this address....

Thanks, Lissa

 
At 5:17 AM, Blogger Matron said...

Claire, I was just looking through my blogs from 1 year ago and I was thinking that I am behind this year compared to where my seedlings were in March 2007! Last year I planted tomato seedlings in January.
Lissa, I'd love to share some of my gardening memories from growing up with my Father. A good subject for a blog! watch this space!

 
At 9:24 AM, Blogger Yolanda Elizabet said...

I tried a different variety of purple french spuds last year and they tasted and looked wonderful! Last year i also grew the Red Duke of York. Not this year though, I don't have enough space for growing spuds.

 
At 10:35 AM, Blogger Karen @ Wiggly Wigglers said...

Hi Matron,

Spud growing is all new to me, but looking forward to it. We are selling a couple of old coloured varieties called Highland Burgundy Red and Salad Blue so I might just have to buy some. Do they taste any different or just make your tongue change colour?!?

 
At 6:30 PM, Blogger Matron said...

Karen, I don't think they taste different. I have read that due to the rich colour they are high in beneficial antioxidants which are common to blue and red fruit and veg.

 

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